Cloves, Indonesia. Photo by Herwin Gunadi, 2016 CGAP Photo Contest Photo by Herwin Gunadi, 2016 CGAP Photo Contest

Donors and Investors

Over the past few decades, public funding for financial inclusion has helped to build an industry that now attracts private funding, both international and local. By 2016, funder commitments to financial inclusion had reached a historic high of $37 billion.

Yet, today many funders have begun to reorganize their work in relation to the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and to articulate ways in which they can better leverage the private sector. Because many funders face competing pressures both in terms of capacity and the funding to deliver on the SDGs, there is an increasing risk of loss of focus on and visibility of financial inclusion and that the deep technical expertise required to build inclusive financial systems will be diluted. On the other hand, this is an opportunity to harness financial inclusion as an enabler of other development goals and to work across different sectors to achieve outcomes that address the needs of a variety of stakeholders. 

Understanding how the financial inclusion sector is evolving is challenging for donors and investors alike. What role can they play in an increasingly complex landscape? What market needs should they be focusing on? How should they go about it?

Through its research, CGAP aims to support and influence donors and investors navigating through these trends, adapting their practices to be more responsive to market needs and contributing to responsible market development for poor people.

Latest Research

Publication

Navigating the Next Wave of Blended Finance for Financial Inclusion

This Brief presents opportunities for the new wave of blended finance and points to areas that deserve further attention to optimize the use of different funding sources to advance responsible financial inclusion.
Publication

Vision of the Future: Financial Inclusion 2025

The future for poor people and financial inclusion is difficult to predict. In what ways will financial services influence inequality and economic participation for poor people by 2025?
Publication

Development Finance Institutions and Financial Inclusion

It is time for DFIs to adopt an alternative approach to financial inclusion that prioritizes needed market changes. A shift to a market systems approach addresses this need and requires that DFIs carefully analyze each market to determine the key gaps, underlying causes, critical actors, and theory of change for bringing about sustainable market development.

Latest Blogs

Blog

Pakistan Enigma: Why Is Financial Inclusion Happening So Slowly?

Just 21 percent of adults have accounts in Pakistan, despite decades of support for financial inclusion. What could accelerate progress?
Blog

It's Time to Slow Digital Credit's Growth in East Africa

New research from Kenya and Tanzania reveals that digital credit is often used for consumption purposes and that delinquency and default rates are high, suggesting funders of digital credit markets should prioritize consumer protection.
Blog

India Moves Toward Universal Financial Inclusion

The 2017 Findex shows India has made significant financial inclusion progress in the past four years, but use remains a challenge.