Bankable Frontier Associates

Bankable Frontier Associates, LLC (BFA) is a global consulting firm specializing in the development of financial services for low income people around the world. Our approach is to seek out, create, and implement solutions to the challenges faced by low income people in managing the financial matters that underpin their lives.

We purposefully partner with cutting-edge financial and non-financial institutions that touch the lives of low income customers. In creating solutions, we integrate our deep expertise in customer insights, business strategy, new technology, and growth-enabling policy and regulation. Founded in 2006, our clients include donors, investors, financial institutions, policymakers, insurers, and payment service providers. 

BFA has offices in Boston, New York, and Nairobi. For more information, please visit: www.bankablefrontier.com.

By Bankable Frontier Associates

Research

Case Study: E-Payments in Uganda with Limited Infrastructure

This case study tracks the design and implementation of the SAGE social transfer program in Uganda, highlights the experiences of various stakeholders and explains lessons learned.
Research

Case Study: Shifting Food Assistance in Kenya to E-Payments

This case study discusses the program elements of the World Food Programme’s Cash for Assets pilot in Kenya, as well as the design and
Research

Case Study: Striving for E-payments at Scale in the Philippines

This case study examines the design and implementation of the 4Ps conditional cash transfer program in the Philippines, explains the experiences of stakeholders and presents lessons learned.
Research

Case Study: Mobile Money-Based Government-to-Person Payments in Haiti

This case study discusses the design and implementation of the Ti Manman Cheri conditional cash transfer program in Haiti as well as the experiences of stakeholders and overall lessons learned from this program.
Research

Interoperability and the Pathways Towards Inclusive Retail Payments in Pakistan

Interoperability of retail payment instruments is not an objective in its own right; rather it is a means of achieving other desirable objectives.