Elizabeth Munee Kiamba

Financial Sector Analyst

Elizabeth Kiamba works across a range of projects at CGAP. She engages with funders, global advocacy bodies, and support organizations to provide guidance, and advocate for effective financial inclusion. She also works on projects on digital finance solutions for last mile clients, micro and small enterprise (MSE) finance and the linkages between financial services, improved livelihoods, and access to basic services.

Before joining CGAP, Elizabeth was the FSD Network Manager at FSD Africa where she managed a portfolio of projects covering varied financial sector themes such as credit, insurance, remittances, housing finance, digital finance and financial integrity. Prior, Elizabeth was a management consultant at PwC’s Public Sector Advisory team where she provided strategic support on project design, implementation and management to government agencies, donors and non-profits, working in different development sectors.

Elizabeth holds Master of Arts degree in Development Management from the Institute of Development Research and Development Policy (IEE) at Ruhr University (Germany), a Bachelor’s degree in Business Management (Finance and Banking) from Moi University (Kenya). She is a certified Project Manager (PRINCE2 Practitioner) and Accountant (CPA).

 

By Elizabeth Munee Kiamba

Blog

Regular Savings from Irregular Income: How Platforms Can Help

CGAP partnered with fintechs and platforms across Sub-Saharan Africa to understand how they are using digital rails to offer savings products to low-income gig workers. Here, we share what we found.
Blog

Why Don’t Fintechs Have a Larger Share of Peru’s MSE Credit Market?

CGAP market sizing research in Peru found that fintechs are only responsible for 0.3% of the MSE credit market. Here, we ask why fintechs have such a small segment of the MSE credit market and posit how that share can be increased.
Research

The Promise of Fintech for Micro and Small Enterprises

Nearly 500 million micro and small enterprises (MSEs) are estimated to be operating around the world. Access to credit and other financial services is critical to the growth and sustainability of these businesses, and consequentially to the low-income and vulnerable populations which rely on MSEs for their livelihoods. Yet despite decades of efforts and some notable successes in expanding MSE finance, the credit gap remains an estimated 4.9 trillion U.S. dollars.
Blog

BNPL in Nigeria: Emerging Fintech Innovations for MSEs

Findings from our recent research suggest BNPL is becoming a significant lending mechanism for Nigerians – especially for micro, small and medium enterprises and self-employed individuals who would not otherwise have access to credit.
Blog

Can Kenya’s Fintech Boom Address the MSE Finance Gap?

Kenya has seen an explosion of fintechs and nano credit providers, but they have yet to meaningfully serve MSEs in the country. We explain how fintechs could have a wider reach and distinct value proposition for MSEs in Kenya beyond digital credit.