Mehmet Kerse

Mehmet Kerse works with CGAP’s policy team on digital financial services regulation and supervision. He has 13 years of experience in financial regulation and supervision and consumer protection. Mehmet began his career as a bank supervisor in the Banking Regulation and Supervision Agency of Turkey and previously worked on anti-money laundering and combatting the financing of terrorism projects for the World Bank. He is a Certified Fraud Examiner.

Mehmet has a Master’s degree in Public Administration from Harvard University’s Kennedy School of Government and a Bachelor’s degree in Economics from Bilkent University.

By Mehmet Kerse

Research

Regulatory Approaches to the Interest Earned on E-Money Float Accounts

What happens to interest earned on float accounts? CGAP believe that electronic money issuers should be allowed – but not required – to distribute some or all of the float interest to their e-money customers.
Blog

Is Financial Inclusion a Reason to Push Central Bank Digital Currencies?

Advocates of Central Bank Digital Currencies (CBDC) often cite financial inclusion as a reason to introduce them. CGAP examines their three main arguments: improved access to digital financial services, enhanced efficiency of payments and lower cost.
Blog

Is Mexico’s “Fintech Law” Leading a New Trend in Fintech Regulation?

Some regulators are looking to Mexico's so-called "fintech law" as an example of how to respond to the full range of fintech innovations in a single law. But this isn't what the Mexican law does, and there are good reasons for this.
Blog

Some Countries Have Digital Bank Licenses, Others Have Digital Banks

Some regulators are creating custom banking licenses for digital banks. Others are licensing digital banks with existing licenses. What's the better way to encourage digital banking?
Research

The Use of Agents by Digital Financial Services Providers

Agents play a crucial role in lowering the cost of delivery to reach the unbanked and underbanked population. An increasing number of countries, especially emerging markets and developing economies, allow a diverse array of banks and nonbank institutions to distribute digital financial services through agents.