William Cook

Financial Sector Specialist

Based in Nairobi, William Cook works on payments systems, interoperability in digital financial services, and the development of CGAP’s learning agendas across Africa and Asia.

Before joining CGAP, Mr. Cook worked as an independent consultant to digital financial services clients across South Asia and the Middle East. He has worked on business models for over-the-top services, open data, and digital advocacy for refugee populations. He also spent six years with Ernst & Young LLP, working across the firm’s data analytics, advisory, and audit practices for financial services clients.

Mr. Cook is a Certified Public Accountant. He has a Master’s degree in Public Administration from the Harvard Kennedy School, a Master’s degree in Information Systems from Michigan State University, and a Bachelor’s degree in Accounting from Michigan State University.

By William Cook

Research

National Payments Corporation of India and the Remaking of Payments

The story of National Payments Corporation of India sheds light on the quick and robust transformation of India’s payment systems. The lessons learned from the NPCI success story can be useful for policy makers in financial inclusion and other markets.
Blog

Should Funders Support Switches for Mobile Payment Interoperability?

Mobile payment switches aren’t the only path to interoperable financial systems – and they aren’t always the best path. Here are three questions funders should ask before they commit to building a switch.
Blog

East African Interoperability: Dispatches from the Home of M-Pesa

Kenyans can now send money between the country's two largest digital wallet services, Airtel and M-Pesa, the latest step toward interoperability in East Africa.
Blog

Connecting the Dots: Interoperability and Technology

For interoperability to work, technology must do more than move transactions from Point A to Point B. It must be optimized to ensure security, encourage use, promote innovation and handle the inevitable time when something goes wrong.